Parish Dinner ~ St. Patrick’s Day Feast

Sunday, March 15th, 2015

Knights Celebrate Oktoberfest with Community

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

St John The Evangelist Catholic Church Annual Yard Sale

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Council Recognizes Knights of the Year

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

At the February Council business meeting, members selected their “People of the Year” for 2014. Each will be submitted for consideration at the NC State level.

Jeff Schandevel

Council Members selected Brother Jeff Schandevel as the Rookie of the Year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John LaFata

Council Members selected SK John LaFata as the Council Knight of the Year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chuck Luce

Council Members selected SK Chuck Luce as Golden Knight of the Year.

Oktoberfest – Saturday September 21, 2013

Saturday, September 14th, 2013

Oktoberfest is a 16-day festival celebrating beer held annually in Munich, Bavaria, Germany. Running from late September to the first weekend in October, it is one of the most famous events in Germany and is the world’s largest fair, with more than 6 million people from around the world attending the event every year. The Oktoberfest is an important part of Bavarian culture, having been held since 1810. Other cities across the world also hold Oktoberfest celebrations, modeled after the original Munich event.

In WAYNESVILLE, we won’t have six million people, but we will share in the Gemütlichkeit…Gemütlichkeit means a situation that induces a cheerful mood, peace of mind, with connotation of belonging and social acceptance, coziness and unhurry. Sounds like the perfect atmosphere for a Knights of Columbus event filled with the unity and fraternalism the order professes. We hope you will join us on Saturday September 21, 2013 at Frog Level Brewery with the Mountain Top Polka Band.

Oktoberfest Waynesville

Catholic, Jesuit University Denies Knights of Columbus Application

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

Spokane, Wash., Apr 11, 2013 / 12:05 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Gonzaga University president Thayne McCulloh will be reviewing the school’s Student Life Office decision which denied a Knights of Columbus Council application to be recognized as a “student club.”

On March 7, the university’s student life division denied the council’s application for recognition as a “student organization,” according to an April 5 report by the Cardinal Newman Society. The Knights of Columbus is a Catholic charitable fraternal organization with 1.8 million members globally.

McCulloh stated April 6 that “Gonzaga honors and respects the purpose and good works of the Knights of Columbus, with which it has a long tradition and mutual collaboration at both local and state levels.”

He has chosen to review the decision of the Division of Student Life, and is expected to take 30-45 days doing so. The president will complete the review “as quickly as he can,” Gonzaga community relations director Mary Joan Hahn told CNA April 10.

The Knights of Columbus has a council at Gonzaga University but it is not recognized as a “student club,” the school has clarified, after reports surfaced that it denied the council its application as such.

“The Knights of Columbus College Council is on-campus and is supported by the University currently,” Hahn said.

“There are many ways for student groups to be present and active on campus,” she explained. “The initial decision pertained to recognition by the Student Life division under its current process.”

“They haven’t been banned,” Hahn added.

Gonzaga said that “the Knights of Columbus College Council (#12583) is already present within the student body and receives support from the administration.”

“Gonzaga University’s core Catholic and Jesuit identity recognizes, encourages and supports many student organizations that advance faith-related issues,” the school said, citing Gonzaga Right to Life and Blessed John Paul II Fellowship.

Though the Council currently exists, it is not recognized as a “student club” or a “student organization.” The decision not to grant the Knights council recognition as a student group was based on the university’s current “club recognition process.”

The Cardinal Newman Society posted excerpts from a letter from the vice president for student life at Gonzaga, Sue Weitz, saying that the Knights of Columbus could not be recognized as a “student organization” because the group is closed to women and to non-Catholics.

“These criteria are inconsistent with the policy and practice of student organization recognition at Gonzaga University, as well as the University’s commitment to non-discrimination based on certain characteristics, one of which is religion.”

Weitz cited Gonzaga’s commitment to “non-discrimination and inclusivity” in her letter.

“To embrace the diversity and yet endorse a group based on faith exclusivity is a challenge that cannot be reconciled at this time. It is a decision about social justice, equity, and the desire of the University to create and maintain an environment in which none are excluded.”

Gonzaga professor denies school’s claim to support Knights

By Carl Bunderson
Eric Cunningham, Associate Professor at Gonzaga University. Courtesy of Eric Cunningham.

Spokane, Wash., Apr 16, 2013 / 12:04 am (CNA).- A professor at Gonzaga University has countered claims by the school that it supports the campus’ Knights of Columbus Council after the group’s application to be a student organization was denied.

“Honestly I don’t see that they’re supported in any way,” Dr. Eric Cunningham, assistant director of Catholic Studies and faculty adviser to the university’s Knights council, told CNA April 15.

On March 7, the university’s student life division denied the council’s application for recognition as a “student organization,” according to an April 5 report by the Cardinal Newman Society. The Knights of Columbus is a Catholic charitable fraternal organization with 1.8 million members globally.

“If they’ve been denied club status, the only way they exist here is that the members of the Knights of Columbus council are enrolled here,” Cunningham stated.

On April 10, Gonzaga’s community relations director, Mary Joan Hahn, told CNA that “the Knights of Columbus College Council is on-campus and is supported by the University currently.”

This year the council has met at a seminary attached to the university, but has not been affiliated with the university, according to university paper “The Gonzaga Bulletin.”

Cunningham has noticed that the council is “listed in our advertising materials,” specifically in a brochure “that goes out to parents” showing the group listed as a student organization.

“So in other words, we’re kind of using them as recruiting tool, telling parents that we have a Knights of Columbus council that their sons can certainly join if they come here.”

The Cardinal Newman Society posted excerpts from a letter from the vice president for student life at Gonzaga, Sue Weitz, saying that the Knights of Columbus could not be recognized as a “student organization” because the group is closed to women and to non-Catholics.

“These criteria are inconsistent with the policy and practice of student organization recognition at Gonzaga University, as well as the University’s commitment to non-discrimination based on certain characteristics, one of which is religion.”

Weitz wrote that the decision is not “some kind of litmus test of Gonzaga’s Catholicity,” according to The Gonzaga Bulletin.

“It is a decision about social justice, equity, and the desire of the University to create and maintain an environment in which none are excluded,” she wrote.

Cunningham understands that roughly $1000 of the council’s funds had been frozen by the Gonzaga student body association,  and he said that “what I hear from the membership, is that hasn’t been returned yet.”

“Not only are they not being supported, they haven’t had their money returned to them. There’s no official support.”

Cunningham has been associated with the council since 2006, and noted that he has made available to them the Catholic studies house, after “they were asked by the director of university ministry to stop meeting there.”

“They don’t have a chapter house, they were actually asked to stop meeting in the house they had been using. So I’d really love to know what Gonzaga is defining as support for the campus council.”

Catholic identity, Cunningham added, is neither well understood nor promoted at Gonzaga University. The school was founded in 1887 and describes itself as a “Catholic, Jesuit, and humanistic university.”

Although during his pontificate Benedict XVI emphasized the importance of Catholic identity in Catholic higher education, “there was no ground for anything Benedict said to gain any traction,” according to Cunningham.

The decision to deny the Knight’s application to be a student group on the basis of non-discrimination policy “epitomizes the condition” at Gonzaga University, and that those who made the decision are “very much representative of the current governing climate of Gonzaga.”

Cunningham lamented that this is typical of numerous Catholic universities, saying that “there’s nothing new about this” and that it “goes on I’m sure at every Catholic college campus in America, that hasn’t made its decision to reform itself as a more ‘Magisterial’ school.”

“They just embrace a view of Catholicism that deviates wildly from any objective understanding of Catholicism that we might want to call ‘Magisterial’ or ‘orthodox,’ for lack of a better word.”

According to Cunningham, “Catholic universities are leading the way in turning Catholicism into a purely secular discourse and are restricting a serious intellectual engagement with what it means to be Catholic.”

Gonzaga University president Thayne McCulloh will be reviewing the school’s Student Life Office decision, and is expected to come to his decision shortly after the academic year ends.

As faculty advisor to the Knights’ council, Cunningham hopes to preserve the council as an “independent agent” rather than placing it under student ministry or the student life office at Gonzaga.

“We understand that Gonzaga considers the Knights of Columbus a discriminatory agency, and…they’re going to be better off as an independent, free-standing club.”

Tags: Catholic Universities Catholic Identity, Knights of Columbus

Asheville Tourists Baseball Outing

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

 

Join Council 15085 of St John the Evangelist Catholic Church for an evening of baseball and fellowship.

FRIDAY MAY 10, 2013, 7:00 PM

Everyone is invited: Knights, Wives, Children, Grandchildren, Friends, perspective members, and anyone else you want to purchase a ticket for.  Ticket prices are $9.00 per seat, $7.00 for child and Seniors.
For Tickets call SK N. Chris Amsler at 619-962-7720.

Getting to the Park MAP

From I-240

Take I-240 to exit 5B Charlotte Street South exit, go south approximately one mile on Charlotte, turn left on McCormick Place (AAMCO Transmission on the corner). McCormick Field is on the Left.


From I-40 Westbound

Take I-40 to Exit 50 Biltmore Avenue, go right off the ramp and North on Biltmore Ave past Mission St. Joe’s Hospital, past the Ford dealer, through 1 traffic light and right at the next street McCormick Place (Gas Station on the corner) McCormick Field is on the Right.


From I-40 Eastbound

Take I-40 to Exit 50 Biltmore Avenue, go left off the ramp and North on Biltmore Ave past Mission St. Joe’s Hospital, past the Ford dealer, through 1 traffic light and right at the next street McCormick Place (Gas Station on the corner) McCormick Field is on the Right.

Knights of Columbus ~ Pledge of Allegiance

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

Civility in America

The Knights of Columbus

and the Pledge of Allegiance

The Knights of Columbus played a large role in the addition of “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance.  When the Pledge was originally written by Francis Bellamy in 1892, it originally read:

“I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

After a proclamation by President Benjamin Harrison, the Pledge was first used in public schools on October 12, 1892, during Columbus Day observances organized to coincide with the opening of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois.

In 1923 the National Flag Conference called for the words “my Flag” to be changed to “the Flag of the United States”, for the benefit of new immigrants, and the words “of America” were added a year later. The United States Congress officially recognized the Pledge as the official national pledge on June 22, 1942.  At a meeting on February 12, 1948, Lincoln’s Birthday, Louis A. Bowman, Chaplain of the Illinois Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, led the Society in swearing the Pledge with two words added, “under God.”  Bowman repeated his revised version of the Pledge at subsequent meetings.

Three years later, in 1951, the Knights of Columbus, the world’s largest Catholic fraternal service organization, also began including the words “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance. On April 30, 1951, the Board of Directors of the Knights of Columbus adopted a resolution to amend the text of their Pledge of Allegiance at the opening of each of the meetings of the 800 Fourth Degree Assemblies of the Knights of Columbus by adding the words “under God” after the words “one nation.” Over the next two years, the idea spread throughout Knights of Columbus organizations nationwide. At the annual meeting on August 21, 1952, the Supreme Council of the Knights of Columbus adopted a resolution urging that the change be made universal and copies of this resolution were sent to the President, the Vice President (as Presiding Officer of the Senate) and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. The National Fraternal Congress meeting in Boston on September 24, 1952, adopted a similar resolution upon the recommendation of its president, Supreme Knight Luke E. Hart. Several State Fraternal Congresses acted likewise almost immediately thereafter. This campaign led to several failed attempts to prompt Congress to adopt the Knights of Columbus’ policy for the entire nation. DOWNLOAD the story here.

On February 7, 1954, President Eisenhower, who had been baptized a Presbyterian just a year before, attended a service honoring Abraham Lincoln at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church.  At that service, Rev. George Docherty delivered a sermon based on the Gettysburg Address arguing that the nations’ might not lay in arms but its spirit and higher purpose. Docherty noted that the Pledge’s sentiments could be those of any nation, that “there was something missing in the pledge, and that which was missing was the characteristic and definitive factor in the American way of life.” He cited Lincoln’s words “under God” as defining words that set the United States apart from other nations.  President Eisenhower said that he agreed with the sermon. In the following weeks, the news spread, and public opinion grew. Three days later, Senator Homer Ferguson, (R-MI), sponsored a bill in Congress to add “under God” to the Pledge; which was approved as a joint resolution June 8, 1954, and signed into law on Flag Day, June 14, 1954 by President Eisenhower.

If the Pledge’s historical pattern repeats, its words will be modified during this decade.  Some prolife advocates recite the following slightly revised Pledge: ‘I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all, born and unborn.’

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References:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pledge_of_Allegiance

http://www.oldtimeislands.org/pledge/pledge.htm

 

From a speech made by Capt. John S. McCain, US, (Rep) who represents Arizona in the U.S. Senate:

As you may know, I spent five and one half years as a prisoner of war during the Vietnam War. In the early years of our imprisonment, the NVA kept us in solitary confinement or two or three to a cell. In 1971 the NVA moved us from these conditions of isolation into large rooms with as many as 30 to 40 men to a room. This was, as you can imagine, a wonderful change and was a direct result of the efforts of millions of Americans on behalf of a few hundred POWs 10,000 miles from home.

One of the men who moved into my room was a young man named Mike Christian. Mike came from a small town near Selma, Alabama. He didn’t wear a pair of shoes until he was 13 years old.

At 17, he enlisted in the US Navy. He later earned a commission by going to Officer Training School. Then he became a Naval Flight Officer and was shot down and captured in 1967.

Mike had a keen and deep appreciation of the opportunities this country, and our military, provide for people who want to work and want to succeed. As part of the change in treatment, the Vietnamese allowed some prisoners to receive packages from home. In some of these packages were handkerchiefs, scarves and other items of clothing. Mike got himself a bamboo needle.

Over a period of a couple of months, he created an American flag and sewed it on the inside of his shirt. Every afternoon, before we had a bowl of soup, we would hang Mike’s shirt on the wall of the cell and say the Pledge of Allegiance. I know the Pledge of Allegiance may not seem the most important part of our day now, but I can assure you that in that stark cell, it was indeed the most important and meaningful event.

One day the Vietnamese searched our cell, as they did periodically, and discovered Mike’s shirt with the flag sewn inside, and removed it. That evening they returned, opened the door of the cell, and for the benefit of all us, beat Mike Christian severely for the next couple of hours.

Then, they opened the door of the cell and threw him in. We cleaned him up as well as we could. The cell in which we lived had a concrete slab in the middle on which we slept. Four naked light bulbs hung in each corner of the room. As I said, we tried to clean up Mike as well as we could. After the excitement died down, I looked in the corner of the room, and sitting there beneath that dim light bulb with a piece of red cloth, another shirt and his bamboo needle, was my friend, Mike Christian. He was sitting there with his eyes almost shut from the beating he had received, making another American flag.

He was not making the flag because it made Mike Christian feel better. He was making that flag because he knew how important it was to us to be able to pledge our allegiance to our flag and country.

So the next time you say the Pledge of Allegiance, you must never forget the sacrifice and courage that thousands of Americans have made to build our nation and promote freedom around the world.

You must remember our duty, our honor, and our country.

Flag of the United States of America“I pledge allegiance to the flag
of the United States of America,
and to the Republic, for which it stands,
one nation, under God,
indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

The Posada ~ An Advent Celebration

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

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11/29/2012

The Posada

 Photos

The Posada is a traditional Christmas celebration that Franciscan missionaries developed in America with the goal of introducing the faith. It continues to be popular throughout the southwestern United States and all of Latin America and is a rich tradition for Knights and their families to share.

The Christmas Posada expresses perfectly the suspense and surprises of the season. It is a prayer, a play, a party and a gathering for families, parishes and whole communities. It is a celebration that children and adults can enjoy together, as well as those from all different cultural backgrounds.

Even if you are not familiar with the Christmas Posada, the Knights of Columbus invites you to join this ancient observance that will open for you the deeper meaning of a joyful season. To help you understand the tradition, the Order offers the booklet The Posada: An Advent & Christmas Celebration (#9898-E,S). DOWNLOAD IT HERE

Through distribution of this booklet, the Order hopes to bring the rich Posada tradition to all Knights and their families as a way of encouraging a sharing of cultures in the Americas around the celebration of the birth of our Savior. This booklet provides all that is needed to conduct a Christmas Posada with your family and your Knights of Columbus council. Copies of the booklet can be viewed in digital formatdownloaded or ordered by using a Requisition Form (#1) and mailing it or faxing it to the Supply Department.

El folleto contiene todo lo necesario para realizar una Posada Navideña con su familia y su consejo de Caballeros de Colón. El folleto puede obtenerse en   formato digital;  descárguelo

La Posada